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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
to wolf blitzer. "situation room" starts right now. >> thanks very much, brook. >>> two weeks before the united states may plunge into financial crisis. plu, media mogul rupert murdoch is just hours away from being grilled and lambasteds by british law makers and now a whistleblower in the growing phone hackl scandal reportedly is dead. and a 77-year-old man defends his home and family from an intruder with a gun. stand by for the dramatic story. that's even more compelling because -- get this -- he's a member of the united states congress. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the u.s. defaulting on its debt for the first time in history? we can't state it enough, this has enormous consequences for all of us, and time is quickly running out to prevent what the president calls armageddon. let's check in with kate baldwin. she's standing by with the latest. where do the negotiations stand right now? >> the two top republicans in the house. no official readout from the white house, but president obama says we are making progress when asked today by reporters how the deb
by members of british parliament. his son, james, and rebecca brooks have also been invited to appear before the hearing. we can go live to westminster. it feels like we're on the deadline hour for learning whether rupert murdoch is going to say yea or nay to appearing. i don't suppose many are expecting him to say oh, go on then. >> i don't think so. for one thing, the parliamentary committees do not have the same powers as congressional committees and certainly they cannot force foreign citizens like rupert and james murdoch to appear before them. there is even a question mark over whether they can really force rebecca brooks, who of course is a british citizen to appear. if anyone buzz does of the three, it is thought that perhaps she will be the most likely. the lawyers at news corp. may be advising against this because of course there is a police investigation going on at the moment and public pressure may not be the best thing for them to be under a at the moment. >> do we know clearly whether or not parliament has the power in any way to compel the likes of rupert or indeed james murd
be the chief executive of the pay tv operations. >> rebecca brooks was left to succeed james murdoch. >> i am convinced that the leadership of the company is the right thing. she is doing the right thing for the company. >> the inescapable point is that rebekah brooks is vulnerable. she is the last person standing. these are times of crisis. his father was hoping that he can make this as his business. >> is joining me now is the political editor of the news of the world, the former express and independents editor. i am joined by rupert murdoch plus -- rupert murdoch's biographer. >> who is to blame. how high that goes is still to be seen. the culture comes from need to make stories, the decision to break the rules. the decision to go that extra 200 miles into illegality. they did not know what was going on and that is inconceivable. >> you were rupert murdoch's biographer. you knew him well and his motivations. is it realistic that he did not have a grip at what was going on. he must have an eye on this. was there an inkling that perhaps he would just let things go. he was a control freak, wa
to hold rebecca broke and -- rebekah brooks and james murdoch to account. this was a summons they could not ignore. >> do the decent thing. the cannot hide away from this level of public anguish. -- you cannot hide away. >> at first, they were reluctant witnesses. rupert murdoch said that he could not attend the session but he was willing to give testimony is an inquiry. rebekah brooks said that "i am available to appear before the committee and welcome the opportunity to do so." she said she would not be able to discuss anything about the police investigation. there was a formal summons. there can even be imprisonment. the threat had worked. the murdochs said they would come and answer the questions. >> in a letter, james murdoch said "i am now coming. i would like to answer them in a different forum." the questions keep coming. why did the news of the world mislead parliament? why did the management failed to find out what was going on and stop it? as for rebekah brooks, we ask about what she told the mps. the mp whose committee will be asking the question was optimistic. >> i hope th
brooks, they sat there hour after hour, taking the questions in good humor. and that gives them credit to their benefit, that they did go through this process. ultimately, though, tonight, as rupert murdoch did say he doesn't take responsibility for what took place although he will have to be the man that sorts it out. >> are you responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who are responsible? >> the people i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> can you name people? >> i worked with mr. hinton for 52 years and i would trust him with my life. >> what i think is interesting in that exchange, the normal phraseology for people doing that is, i was not to blame, but i take responsibility. the buck stops here. and what we didn't get there was that phraseology or some version thereof. we also finally, wolf, we did get later on in his final statement the hacking was wrong, the payments to the police were wrong, no excuses. >> and there was an incident there at one point where an intruder just showed up with some shaving cream. tell our viewers what happened. >> the pic
his first in command, rebecca brook, was sort of toeing the appropriate line. so whether there's a cover-up there that reaches the highest levels of newscorp or whether it's just the head of a company where there are problems and he's trying to fix them as best he can, i guess we'll -- we may find out. we may not find out. >> some people seem to feel it's really that connection between the rebecca brook, the "news of the world" editor, formerly, and the power that she really had in politics. and david cameron's former assistant also having worked over at the paper. that there just seems to be this coziness that is making people uncomfortable. >> well, i mean, we have the same thing in washington frankly. there's been a lot of coziness over the years. the white house press corps and the -- and government at all levels. i think that's a problem when people live and work and depend on each other for their livelihood. as the press and powerful people do. but, you know, i think murdoch is probably -- may not be the person this hits. i mean, i wonder if there's -- if there's an equiv
summoned murdoch's son james and former "news of the world" editor rebecca brooks. >>> in london today, the parents of murdered teen milly met political leaders in parliament. salley and bob say the phone hacking investigation nuft look at politician's ties to the media, and dowlers say it fueled this. they were given false hope she was alive. it led to other disclosures of hacking or hacking attempts that reached all the way to the royal throne. >>> well, stocks are treading water today. the dow chips have been moving between positive and negative territory all morning. the dow jones down about 16 points or so. investors are perhaps taking a breather on negotiations over the debt ceiling playing out in washington. >>> president obama says there's a groundhog day feeling at the white house. he and congressional leaders immediate again today to work on a deal to raise the nation's borrowing limit. republicans are insisting on deep cuts only. the president wants to close tax loopholes as well. now, the debt ceiling deadline is three weeks from today. and so far, nobody is blinking. >>> i
murdoch, his son james, and reb ekah brooks. bbc newsnight tell us tell they are covering the story. >> tonight, robert mcdowell on the fcc's action to begin cracking down on unauthorized service charges to cell phone bills. that is tonight on "de communicators -- "the communicators." the nuclear regulatory agency officially make recommendations within 90 days. the industry would have five years for any new regulations to come from the process. >> we are honored to be here today, speaking at this venerable institution. the national press club is a venue like no other. it has been at the center of washington news. as i was preparing for this, in my staff did a little investigation, they understood the historic emblem was that of an owl. i will not claim wisdom and i will let you judge my awareness, but i can relate to the long nights spent sleepless on the job. as chairman of the new tillage -- the nuclear regulatory commission, one of the best aspects of my job is having the opportunity to lead a staff of nearly 4000 talented public servants. we hear from all sides and all perspecti
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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